Blog, Coach Articles, Cycle U News, Dean's Letter, Tips and Tricks, Training, Uncategorized

Bring the HEAT!

Hello Cycling Friends,

Well, it was a wet Winter and I hope you are enjoying getting out on the roads as much as I am. We had a fantastic Chelan training camp in mid May which is always my kick-off to outdoor riding after riding almost exclusively on the indoor trainers all Winter. I have to report that after the agony of the first long hilly day where my body was screaming “what? more than an hour in this position? 6 hours?! How can we hold good form this long?” I felt better each day and the camaraderie and fun of riding in “little Italy” for 5 days with great people really boosted my spirits. I also set a new PR on the dreaded McNeil Canyon, and at 54 years old I have to say that felt pretty darn good.

This time of year it is all about hitting the big training rides and events to “see what your body can do” and working on weak areas of the skill sets that apply to your target goals. Here are the 2 little things I taught people at Chelan Camp and in our recent outdoor classes to improve their cycling:

#1. Double shift, when you finish a descent or fast section and hit the hill, you are grabbing easier gears with the right shifter, till you are at the end. Then you go to shift into the smaller chainring and “$*#(@#^!! my chain is off – or my legs spin out of control and I lose my momentum!” Here is how it works: when in the big ring and easiest gear on back and the hill starts, don’t just shift into the small ring, shift BOTH from the big to small chainring AND from the largest/easiest cog on the rear wheel down a couple gears with the right shifter at the same time. Your chain will stay on as you improve your chain-line and you will be in a good gear without dropping to a gear that is too easy and spin out. Some mechanics talk about “cross chaining” and I say it is bunk! Your bike should work in every gear if adjusted correctly and your job is to ride it and work hard, not be distracted with what your chain line is doing. Of course the new 1 x drive-trains coming from mountain biking will solve all this in the near future, but until then, try the double-shift on your next ride.

#2. Corner with your eyes. You have the best balance with your head level. Your inner ear will help you maintain balance but if you look down, you lose your natural ability to make small balancing adjustments. Try it just walking or running, try to navigate a less than smooth surface by looking down, then look up further and use your peripheral vision to see the trail below you. This is just as important on the bike where things happen much faster.

For these and deeper training and skill tips, schedule a private lesson with me to unlock your best cycling and hill climbing.

See you on the Roads!

Coach Craig

Blog, Coach Articles, Cycle U News, Training, Uncategorized

Have you thought about racing your bike?

So, you are getting faster on your bike.  When you started maybe you were averaging 8-10 mph on your longer rides, but now that that you have been training for STP, RSVP, Flying Wheels and similar events your average speed is getting closer to 15+ mph on longer rides and you are wondering what the next step is?
 
I finished STP in one day in 1985 with 10 friends from the UW and after that I was so hooked I started hanging out at bike shops and reading every bike article I could find.  Racing seemed risky and way beyond my ability, so I was happy to just study it.
 
When I moved to Colorado after College, I began working at the Moots bike shop and they began taking me out after work to show me how to *really* ride.  I learned how to race from those guys, and when the Steamboat Stage race came to town that Summer I was ready to try my first race.  
 
In the NW there are many races, but these 3 are the best choices for new riders :
 
1.  Cyclocross 
2.  Pacific Raceways or Seward Park weekly races, SBRP*
3.  Jerry Baker Velodrome 
*Sprint Triathlon and Mountain Biking are other common ways people start racing, but they require a Mountain Bike or you have to like swimming and running. 
 
 
 
 

Beginning racer clinic at Pacific Raceways

Here is how to tell which is best for you:
 
-Do you ride with racer types or HPC on the road and keep pace with them?  (#2 or 3 above)
-Do you have a mountain or cyclocross bike and like the dirt?  (#1, the safest and best intro to racing that will also make you a better rider on the road)
 
 

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Seattle Bike Show Review, formerly Seattle Bike Expo

I think this was the 19th year in a row I had a booth at the Seattle Bike Expo or Bike show.  It is interesting to see how things have changed over the years, I was the first professional Bicycle Coach in Seattle to be at the show in 1997, at that time people said “who needs a bike coach, everyone knows how to ride a bike!”  How wrong they were…but this year there weren’t any other coaches there, but there was some cool stuff despite there being less bike shops in attendance.

#1 on my list is the new locally made Gerard bicycles, a very sexy looking road machine created by local racing/cool guy legend John Sheehan, former Irish national champion who is making these sweet rides out of Kirkland!  They look like a cross between a Pinarello and an Orbea, Here is a link and a pic:Oh and there were some cool bikes from Portland, and fenders and other fancy artesian stuff…but who cares, I’m not really into the “slow” bike thing, although I support anyone not in a hurry, just don’t get in my way : )

#2 holy crap the Electric bikes are here!  This show had more electric bikes than charity century rides, there were blocks of 10 booths ALL electric with CRAZY looking machines that looked like mini motor cycles, scooters, regular bikes and trikes.  

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