Coach Articles, Tips and Tricks, Training, Uncategorized

Staying Cool on your bike #2

Skip the warm-up
When the temperatures are at or above 80-90 degrees, there’s really no reason to put in much of a warm up. You’ll probably find that it won’t take long for your muscles to warm up so I would recommend trying to stay cool. Stay in the shade, pour cold water over your head and onto your shorts and jersey. In even more extreme temperatures, I have used ice in my jersey as well as in stockings stuffed down the back of my jersey.
 
Staying cool
When you’re racing in temperatures over 90 degrees, heat exhaustion is a real health concern that I’ve personally experienced and is not to be taken lightly. If you start to get nauseous, dizzy or foggy/start to black out, then you are past ‘the point of no return’ and you should stop riding immediately and get cooled off as soon as possible. No matter how acclimated one is to the temperature, there is a maximum amount of time in those temperatures one can exhaust themselves in so don’t take temperature extremes for granted under any circumstance.
 
Hydration
Part of staying hydrated also has to do with the proper amount of electrolytes in the liquids that you’re ingesting.  The hotter it is, the more sweat and electrolytes will be drawn from your body.  If you start a ride, whether it’s hot or not, already dehydrated, there is no physically possible way for you to make that up during the ride. Always start any physical activity properly hydrated and again, listen to your body for how often you need to drink. 
 
Sipping more frequently is better than gulping infrequently for several reasons: it’s easier on your system to absorb water and electrolytes if taken in smaller and more spaced out amounts and also if you’re already taxing your body in extreme temperatures, adding another ‘pressure’ of having to deal with GI distress is only going to make your body’s ability to sustain the endurance &/or effort that much harder.
 
For a complete description of signs, symptoms and preventive measures to take for heat exhaustion, heat stroke and other heat stress conditions the Center for Disease Control has a complete list here.

 

*”Heat Acclimation improves exercises performance” published in the October issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology
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Coach Articles, Tips and Tricks, Training, Uncategorized

Beat the Heat – on your bike

I’m originally from Utah (this is Heather Neilson the new Coach and sales person at Cycle U) where the temperatures swing to more extremes than they do in either Northern California or the Pacific Northwest where I live now. However, riding or racing in higher temperatures than what you are used to can cause anyone to experience negative heat related consequences with a concurrent decrease in performance depending on how acclimated you are. 
 
In other words, it doesn’t have to reach 100 degrees while doing an outdoor activity for you to experience heat related illness.  You become acclimated to whatever climate you are living and riding in over a fairly short period of time; and you may find that you struggle riding in temperatures than you previously had very little trouble tolerating if it is new once again.
ridingintheheat
Photo compliments Erik Cho
Acclimating
The time it will take to acclimate to the heat is individual and you will need to pay attention to your body to decide how to ride that line.  As a guide however, there was a study performed by human physiology researchers at the University of Oregon wherein it was discovered that large physiological gains can be achieved in trained cyclists by doing 90 minute easy rides in high heat for 10 days.* 
 
 It’s not necessary to ride in the heat every day. The main idea is to acclimate slowly over time in either temperature extreme and learn to listen to your body. So very much like the rest of training, listening to your body is an absolutely necessary skill to have, now get out there and gradually get used to it!

Stay tuned for the next segment, Staying COOOL!  

 

 

 
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Blog, Coach Articles, Cycle U News, Dean's Letter, Training, Uncategorized

Dean’s Letter: Make Yourself Do It

CrossMud

I gave my 1000th racing class this week on a typical rainy Seattle day. I taught a few new guys the ropes, told them about protecting their front wheel, riding straight and predictable, looking before moving around. I described how the pack moves like an amoeba and explained how to save energy by drafting off your fellow riders. For almost an hour I gave them racing tips as we rolled over the course to get warmed up and scout out obstacles. Then it was time to decide whether to race or not.

In my class advertisements I say that I ride with my students, but I have a personal policy not to race in the rain at Pacific Raceways. Cars leave so much oil on the roadway that racing in the rain can get sketchy fast. But I made a commitment to ride, so I donned an extra layer and headed to the start line. I would race with my students, at least for a lap or two.

On the first lap I was yelling comments out to all the riders. This was a beginner race, so I had plenty of coaching to do. Road grit and water clung to my teeth, leaving a nasty taste in my mouth. I noticed one of our guys was fading fast so I drifted to the back of the pack, giving him a wheel to focus on catching. By the end of the circuit, he had pushed forward and rejoined the group.

The race gained intensity on the second lap and we split into two groups. I tried to glue the pack back together, encouraging my racers to work steadily so they didn’t overexert themselves early on.

Our third lap around, my straggler was barely hanging on. He was struggling to keep up but gritted his teeth and stayed with the group up the hills. The other riders were doing fine, so I stayed back to support him. As we were approaching the next big downhill I yelled for him to stay back, but he powered to the front. He was first on the descent, but he had ignored racing tip #74: Don’t attack on the downhill when you are tired. You will get chewed up in the ascent and spit out the back of the group. Sure enough, it was his last lap anywhere near the chase group.

One of the lighter riders in our group made similar mistakes. She was blown back on downhill stretches by heavier riders with more momentum, but climbed back to the front every time. I explained to her that on descents it is better to stay behind the rider you are following, even if you are 20 feet apart. The draft has a tail which helps you coast up into the bottom of the next hill, making it easier to climb. After giving her a few tips I moved on, coaching my way around the chase group.

Before I knew it, we were on the last lap and I had done the whole wet miserable race, loving every minute of it. I was reminded that the hardest part can be convincing yourself to just get out there and go for it. I am so glad I didn’t talk myself out of racing before I had a chance, and I hope you do the same. Putting your nose out there and going for it is the only way you will find out how much fun you would have missed.

C U on the Road,

Craig Undem